Example Policies

State
 
  • Legislatures can adopt statutes to limit marketing in schools. Maine was the first state in the nation to pass such a law.
     
  • State contracts can be used to reduce marketing of sugary drinks to children. Contract language can specify the type of products beverage companies are allowed to advertise on the outside of vending machines, and in facilities and buildings operated by the state government. 
 
Local
 
  • In 2015, the city of San Francisco approved legislation targets advertising of sodas by:
     
  1. Requiring health warnings on posted ads for sugar-sweetened beverages with 25 or more calories per 12 ounces. The warning will read “WARNING: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay. This is a message from the City and County of San Francisco.” 
     
  2. Banning ads on publically owned property (this provision was repealed in December 2015)
     
  3. Prohibiting the use of city funds for the purchase of sugary beverages.
  • Local government can enact a policy to limit where sugary drinks may be sold – for example, at locations commonly frequented by children, or in stores that do not sell food as their primary business (such as clothing and toy stores). 
     
  • Local government can put conditions on the provision of toys with children’s meals. The toy is one of the industry’s most powerful marketing strategies. The County of Santa Clara, CA enacted an ordinance  that requires meals with toys meet nutritional standards. 
     
  • Vendor contracts can be used to reduce marketing of sugary drinks to children. Contract language can specify the type of products beverage companies are allowed to advertise on the outside of vending machines, and in facilities and buildings operated by local government.
     
  • Local signage ordinances can be used to reduce overall exposure of children to advertising by specifying the locations, types and sizes of signs posted on billboards, commercial properties and buildings. However, such ordinances cannot target specific products or categories of products. 
 
Schools
 
  • School wellness policies can be written to limit the sale and marketing of sugary drinks to children.  In 2014, USDA issued proposed rules for Local School Wellness Policy Implementation as required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (2010) . The rules would allow marketing of only those foods and beverages allowed to be sold during the school day (i.e., those meeting the USDA’s Smart Snacks in Schools nutrition guidelines).  Under these rules, images of Coke or Pepsi’s sugar-sweetened sodas on school posters and vending machines, and even company branding on cups, would be prohibited.
     

Resources