Default Beverages in Restaurant Kids' Meals

Example Policies

Kids' meal beverage policies require a healthy beverage option to be offered as the default beverage in restaurant kids' meals. 

Resources

Kids' Meal Toolkit (request from Voices for Healthy Kids)
AHA Model Kids' Meal Ordinance 

School and Afterschool 

Example Policies

Federal

The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 required the USDA to establish nutrition standards for all foods sold in schools, beyond the federally-supported meals programs. In 2013, the USDA put forth the Smart Snacks in School nutrition standards, detailing the types of foods and beverages that may be SOLD in schools during school hours.  The new beverages options allowed under Smarts Snacks in School are summarized in this USDA Issue Brief.

State

California:  SB 12 and SB 965 (enacted in 2005) set up rigorous new nutrition standards for food and beverages offered at elementary, middle, and high schools.

Local

  • Los Angeles Unified School District Good Food Procurement Resolution - incorporates food policy that sets nutritional standards for food sold in schools, eliminates milk with added sugars and flavoring, and bans the sale of soda in vending machines, student stores, and cafeterias at LAUSD school sites.
     
  • School Wellness Policies:  According to federal law, schools participating in the National School Lunch Program or other federal Child Nutrition programs must adopt and adhere to a local school wellness policy.  Through the wellness policy, a school district can go beyond state and federal requirements and adopt stronger rules that - for example, restrict the sale or free offering of sugary beverages at all school fundraisers and events that take place on school property, or during non-school hours. For optional policy language, please refer to ChangeLab Solutions’ guide to School Wellness Policies below.
     
Resources
 

Childcare Settings

Example Policies

Federal

Under the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, childcare facilities that receive funding under the federal Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) are required to make free drinking water available throughout the day and limit the fat content of the milk served to children aged two years and older.  The USDA issued guidance for implementation of the water and milk requirements in 2011.

State

California: AB 2084 (enacted in 2010) requires new beverage standards be included in the licensing and regulation of childcare facilities. Under these beverage standards, clean and safe drinking water must be made available throughout the day, with the only other allowable beverage options being 1% or non-fat milk, 100% fruit juice (one serving per day only), and beverages with no added sweeteners.

Resources

City & County Facilities

Example Policies
 
The sample policies below are from cities and counties that have established nutrition standards for all beverages sold in vending machines in city/county facilities and/or served in city/county-run programs.
 
 
Resources
 

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