PUBLICATIONS

Title (Click to sort alphabetically) Published Yearsort ascending Topic Resource Type File URL
Employment Impact of Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Taxes
Powell LM, Wada R, Persky JJ, and Chaloupka FJ. April 2014. American Journal of Public Health.
2014 Policy Research Link
Looking Beyond the Marketing Claims of New Beverages - Health Risks of Consuming Sports Drinks, Energy Drinks, Fortified Waters and Other Flavored Beverages
Pirotin S, Becker C, Crawford P (2014).  Looking Beyond the Marketing Claims of New Beverages - Health Risks of Consuming Sports Drinks, Energy Drinks,  Fortified Waters and Other Flavored Beverages.  University of California at Berkeley, Atkins Center for Weight and Health.  This report will discuss the major categories of fortified beverages, presenting data on their nature, their ingredients, their similarities and differences, the possible effects on children of their consumption, and areas for further research.  
2014 Sugary drinks, Marketing Reports and Tool Kits Link
Association between sugar-sweetened beverages and type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis
Wang M, Yu M, Fang L and Hu RY. Journal of Diabetes Investigation. 2014. DOI: 10.1111/jdi.12309 Findings suggested that sugar-sweetened beverages intake was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and the association was attenuated by adjustment for BMI. Specifically, the associations were also found significant positive in USA, Europe.
2014 Diabetes, Sugary drinks Research Link
Fructose content in popular beverages made with and without high-fructose corn syrup
Walker R, Dumke K, Goran M. “Fructose content in popular beverages made with and without high-fructose corn syrup.” Nutrition, 2014. Conclusion: Our results provide evidence of higher than expected amounts of free fructose in some beverages. Popular beverages made with HFCS have a fructose-to-glucose ratio of approximately 60:40, and thus contain 50% more fructose than glucose. Some pure fruit juices have twice as much fructose as glucose. These findings suggest that beverages made with HFCS and some juices have a sugar profile very different than sucrose, in which amounts of fructose and glucose are equivalent. Current dietary analyses may underestimate actual fructose consumption.
2014 Sugar, Sugary drinks Research Link
Looking Beyond the Marketing Claims of New Beverages - Health Risks of Consuming Sports Drinks, Energy Drinks, Fortified Waters and Other Flavored Beverages
Pirotin S, Becker C, Crawford P (2014).  Looking Beyond the Marketing Claims of New Beverages - Health Risks of Consuming Sports Drinks, Energy Drinks,  Fortified Waters and Other Flavored Beverages.  University of California at Berkeley, Atkins Center for Weight and Health.  This report will discuss the major categories of fortified beverages, presenting data on their nature, their ingredients, their similarities and differences, the possible effects on children of their consumption, and areas for further research.  
2014 Sugary drinks, Marketing Reports and Tool Kits Link
Association between sugar-sweetened beverages and type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis
Wang M, Yu M, Fang L and Hu RY. Journal of Diabetes Investigation. 2014. DOI: 10.1111/jdi.12309 Findings suggested that sugar-sweetened beverages intake was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and the association was attenuated by adjustment for BMI. Specifically, the associations were also found significant positive in USA, Europe.
2014 Diabetes, Sugary drinks Research Link
Reducing Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption by Providing Caloric Information
Objectives. We examined the ways in which adolescents altered the type and size of their purchases of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), together with whether the effects persisted after removing caloric information signs in stores. Results. We found that providing caloric information significantly reduced the number of total beverage calories purchased, the likelihood of buying an SSB, and the likelihood of buying an SSB greater than 16 ounces (P < .05). After removing the signs, the quantity, volume, and number of calories from SSB purchases remained lower than baseline (P < .05). Conclusions. Providing caloric information was associated with purchasing a smaller SSB, switching to a beverage with no calories, or opting to not purchase a beverage; there was a persistent effect on reducing SSB purchases after signs were removed. Bleich S, Barry CL, Gary-Webb TL, and Herring BJ. Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print October 16, 2014: e1–e8. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2014.302150
2014 Sugary drinks Research Link
Soda and Cell Aging: Associations Between Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Healthy Adults From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys
Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened sodas might influence metabolic disease development through accelerated cell aging. Leung C et.al. Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print October 16, 2014: e1–e7. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2014.302151
2014 Sugary drinks Research Link
Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption Among Adults — 18 States, 2012
To assess regular soda and fruit drink consumption among adults in 18 states, CDC analyzed data from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Among the 18 states surveyed, 26.3% of adults consumed regular soda or fruit drinks or both ≥1 times daily. By state, the prevalence ranged from 20.4% to 41.4% [CA = 22.9%]. Overall, consumption of regular soda or fruit drinks was most common among persons aged 18‒34 years (24.5% for regular soda and 16.6% for fruit drinks), men (21.0% and 12.3%), non-Hispanic blacks (20.9% and 21.9%), and Hispanics (22.6% and 18.5%). Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. August 15, 2014. Vol. 63. No. 32
2014 Sugary drinks Research Link
Kick the Can - They Say, We Know 8/2014 2014 Beverage industry Fact Sheet Link
2014 Sugary Drink FACTS Report
2014 Sugary Drink FACTS (Food Advertising to Children and Teens Score)
2014 Sugary drinks Reports and Tool Kits Link
Body Mass Index Categories and Mortality Risk in US Adults: The Effect of Overweight and Obesity on Advancing Death
Compared with normal-weight adults, obese adults had at least 20% significantly higher rate of dying of all-cause or CVD.
2014 Obesity Research Link
ChangeLab Solutions: Model Legislation Requiring Safety Warning for Sugar-Sweetened Beverages
From ChangeLab Solutions, this model legislation is developed for states that want to implement a policy requiring a safety warning on SSB containers and packaging. Intended for use by states seeking to increase consumer awareness. Includes model findings, which are an accompanying set of evidence-backed facts that support the legislation.
2014 Sugary drinks Legislation/Policy Link
Diet-Beverage Consumption and Caloric Intake Among US Adults, Overall and by Body Weight
Overweight and obese adults drink more diet beverages than healthy-weight adults and consume significantly more solid-food calories and a comparable total calories than overweight and obese adults who drink SSBs. Heavier US adults who drink diet beverages will need to reduce solid-food calorie consumption to lose weight.
2014 Sugary drinks Research Link
Kick the Can Factsheet: Sugary Drinks and Diabetes
Kick the Can's Factsheet on "Sugary Drinks and Diabetes".  Sept 2014
2014 Diabetes Fact Sheet Link
The Impact of Social Media Conversations on Consumer Brand Choices
Liu, Y and Lopez, R. University of Connecticut. Poster 2014. Summary: How does word-of-mouth (WOM) and social media affect consumer’s preferences and choices in the carbonated soft drink (CSD) market? Research shows that consumer exposure to WOM on various social media sites can be a significant driver of consumer purchasing behavior. Consumers’ conversations about brands and nutritional aspects of CSDs have a significant impact on their preferences. However, the volume of WOM rather than the sentiment is what matters the most. This has important implications not only for firm strategy but also for public health policy aimed at influencing consumer diets. Further, based on the demand parameter estimates, we simulate the market shares for all brands under alternative scenarios. (1) No specific social media conversations on each brand: setting the brand social media goodwill for all CSD products to zero, while assuming other variables at constant levels. (2) A national health campaign on CSDs, which leads to increasing discussion of sugar on social media sites, assuming the total social media conversations regarding sugar is increased by 10% . (3) No social media conversations regarding caffeine. We find that Coke and Pepsi would experience the largest decrease in market shares without brand social media conversations and that sugary CSDs would suffer larger losses with a higher level of conversations about sugar.
2014 Marketing Research Link
Hiding Under a Health Halo (Policy Brief): Examining the Data Behind Health Claims on Sugary Beverages
By Atkins Center for Weight and Health, UC Berkeley, and California Center for Public Health Advocacy. 2014.   Beverage companies commonly promote questionable and often misleading health claims for relatively new categories of nutrient fortified sugar-sweetened beverages – sports drinks, energy drinks, “enhanced” fruit drinks, and bottled teas and coffees – designed and marketed to attract increasingly health-conscious consumers.   However, careful investigation clarifies the true nature of these beverages and the reality behind manufacturers’ health claims.  
2014 Beverage industry Reports and Tool Kits Link
Added Sugars. Subtracted Science: How Industry Obscures Science and Undermines Public Health Policy on Sugar
This report explores how sugar interests have actively sought to deceive the public and ensure that Americans continue to consume high amounts of sugar.  By the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists.
2014 Beverage industry Reports and Tool Kits Link
Diabetes Tied to a Third of California Hospital Stays, Driving Health Care Costs Higher
Increasing diabetes prevalence has been found to be a primary driver of increased health care costs in the United States. This policy brief examines the impact of diabetes on hospitalizations and related hospitalization costs in California. Using 2011 hospital patient discharge data and annual financial data from the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD), this study found that patients with diabetes represented 31 percent of hospitalizations in California in 2011 among patients 35 years or older, including 39 percent of African-American andAsian-American patients and 43 percent of Latino patients. Moreover, these hospitalizations cost nearly $2,200 more per hospitalization than those for patients without diabetes, regardless of the primary reason for the hospitalization. 
2014 Diabetes Research Link
Energy Drink Self-Regulation
This report from the Public Health Advocacy Institute discusses how energy drink companies are viloating self-regulation guidelines established by their trade group, the American Beverage Association.
2013 Beverage industry Reports and Tool Kits Link
Relationship of Soft Drink Consumption to Global Overweight, Obesity, and Diabetes: A Cross-National Analysis of 75 Countries
This study estimated the relationship between soft drink consumption and obesity and diabetes worldwide and found that soft drink consumption is significantly linked to overweight, obesity, and diabetes worldwide, including in low- and middle-income countries. 
2013 Sugary drinks, Diabetes Research Link
Resolved: there is sufficient scientific evidence that decreasing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption will reduce the prevalence of obesity and obesity-related diseases
This review summarizes the preponderance of evidence to date supporting the link between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and obesity. Specifically, the author discusses results from randomized controlled trials and prospective cohort studies, which provide the strongest support for causation. The author concludes that available evidence for sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and obesity meets all of the criteria used to establish causation in non-communicable disease epidemiology. Steps should be taken immediately to reduce sugar-sweetened beverage consumption rather than waiting for additional evidence. Citation: Hu FB. Resolved: there is sufficient scientific evidence that decreasing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption will reduce the prevalence of obesity and obesity-related diseases. Obes Rev. Jun 13 2013.
2013 Sugary drinks Research Link
Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Weight Gain in 2- to 5-Year-Old Children
This study used a longitudinal cohort of children (followed from birth ot age 5) to examine the impact of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption on BMI. The study found that children at age 5 who drank SSBs regularly had 43% higher odds of being obese.
2013 Sugary drinks Research Link
Sugary Drinks and Latino Kids
This document explores the impact of sugary drink consumption by Latino kids and provides policy recommendations to combat the negative health effects of sugary drinks.
2013 Sugary drinks Fact Sheet Link
Caregivers' Psychosocial Factors Underlying 3 Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Non-Hispanic 4 Black Preschoolers: An Elicitation Study
Qualitative study describing the factors that influence caregiver decisions to serve sugar-sweetened beverages to non-hispanic black preschoolers. Factors considered include but are not limited to convenience, cost, taste, potential health consequences, availability, and pressure from other parents. Full Citation: Tipton JA. Caregivers' Psychosocial Factors Underlying Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Non-Hispanic Black Preschoolers: An Elicitation Study. J Pediatr Nur. 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2013.06.006.
2013 Sugary drinks Research Link
The Future of Beverages: 7 Key Changes the Beverage Industry Must Accept
The beverage industry, multifarious in its composition and structure, is ever-evolving and consistently growing in stature. With an enormous array of beverage options available to consumers, the market has been divided into confusing subsections, but one thing is clear: the future of beverages is healthy. 
2013 Beverage industry Reports and Tool Kits Link
A Guide to Food Industry Front Groups
One increasingly common way industry attempts to shape the public discourse is by forming a group that appears to benefit the public. Often these groups claim to represent farmers or consumers or some other sympathetic constituency when in fact they are funded by powerful industry players.
2013 Beverage industry Reports and Tool Kits Link
Caffeinated and Caffeine-Free Beverages and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes
After major lifestyle and dietary risk factors were controlled for, caffeinated and caffeine-free SSB intake was significantly associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes in the Nurses' Health Study. Full Citation: Bhupathiraju SN, Pan A, Malik VS, et al. Caffeinated and caffeine-free beverages and risk of type 2 diabetes. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013; 97: 155-166.
2013 Sugary drinks, Diabetes Research Link
California Field Research Poll: Obesity in Rural California Counties
California Field Research Poll: Obesity in Rural California Counties. Ninety-four percent of registered voters surveyed in 12 rural California counties say obesity is a serious problem for the nation, and 84 percent believe it’s a serious problem for their communities, a Field Research poll released Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013 finds. A majority of these voters say their communities should do more to address obesity, and want help from business, government, individuals and community groups.
2013 Obesity Research Link
Associations Between Obesity and Comorbid Mental Health, Developmental, and Physical Health Conditions in a Nationally Representative Sample of US Children Aged 10 to 17
Childhood overweight and obesity were associated with higher rates of ADHD, conduct disorders, depression, learning disabilities, developmental delay, good/fair/poor teeth, bone/joint/muscle problems, asthma, allergies, headaches, and ear infections. Full Citation: Halfon N, Larson K, Slusser W. Associations Between Obesity and Comorbid Mental Health, Developmental, and Physical Health Conditions in a Nationally Representative Sample of US Children Aged 10 to 17. Academic Pediatrics. 2013: 13(1); 6-13.
2013 Obesity Research Link
Disparities in Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened and Other Beverages by Race/Ethnicity and Obesity Status Among United States Schoolchildren.
Beverage consumption patterns did not substantially differ across weight status groups, but by race/ethnicity in the home. Full Citation: Dodd AH, Briefel R, Cahili C, et al. Disparities in consumption of sugar-sweetened and other beverages by race/ethnicity and obesity status among United States schoolchildren. J Nutr Educ Beh. 2013; 45(3).
2013 Sugary drinks Research Link
The relationship of sugar to population-level diabetes prevalence: an econometric analysis of repeated cross-sectional data
"Differences in sugar availability statistically explain variations in diabetes prevalence rates at a population level that are not explained by physical activity, overweight or obesity." Full Citation: Basu S, Yoffe P, Hills N, Lustig RH (2013) The Relationship of Sugar to Population-Level Diabetes Prevalence: An Econometric Analysis of Repeated Cross-Sectional Data. PLoS ONE 8(2): e57873. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0057873
2013 Diabetes, Sugar Research Link
Health Advocates Call on Beverage Industry to Make Changes that Matter
Press Release from CCPHA  (January 17, 2013). AsCoca-cola airs a commercial lauding their efforts to address obesity and CCPHA recommends 7 ways the industry could acutally help fight obesity.
2013 Marketing Media/Opinion Link
Expanding Portion Sizes in the US Marketplace: Implications for Nutrition Counseling
Study examining food and beverage portion sizes and changes in these over time. Full Citation: Young LR, Nestle M. Expanding Portion Sizes in the US Marketplace: Implications for Nutrition Counseling. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 2003; 103(2): 231-234.
2013 Obesity Research Link
Consumption of artificially and sugar-sweetened beverages and incident type 2 diabetes
This longitudinal cohort study showed a direct association between sugar-sweetened beverages and artificically-sweetened beverages and risk of Type 2 Diabetes in women, which persisted after adjustment for BMI and energy intake. Full Citation: Fagherazzi G, Vilier A, Sartorelli DS, Lajous M, Balkau B, Clavel-Chapelon F. Consumption of artificially and sugar-sweetened beverages and incident type 2 diabetes in the Etude Epide´ miologique aupre` s des femmes de la Mutuelle Ge´ ne´ rale de l’Education Nationale–European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2013.
2013 Sugary drinks, Diabetes Research Link
Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Young Children
Kick the Can's fact sheet on the effects of sugary drinks on young children.
2013 Sugary drinks Fact Sheet Link
Water and Sports Drinks
Kick the Can's fact sheet on water and sports drinks.
2013 Sugary drinks Fact Sheet Link
The Health Consequences of Drinking Soda and Other Sugar-Sweetened Beverages
Kick the Can's fact sheet about the health effects of drinking sugary beverages.
2013 Sugary drinks Fact Sheet Link
Healthy hospital food initiatives in the United States: time to ban sugar sweetened beverages to reduce childhood obesity.
In this viewpoint, a pediatrician from the University of California, San Francisco makes a strong case for removing sugar-sweetened beverages from hospitals. Citation: Wojcicki JM. Healthy hospital food initiatives in the United States: time to ban sugar sweetened beverages to reduce childhood obesity. Acta Paediatr. Jun 2013;102(6):560-561.
2013 Sugary drinks Research Link
How Sugar Sweetened Beverages Became a Leading Contributor to the Obesity Epidemic
Kick the Can's fact sheet about the beverage industry's bold and unrelenting marketing campaigns, increases in sugary drink portion sizes, concerted efforts by the beverage industry to keep prices low, and dramatic expansion of sugary drink product availability.
2013 Sugary drinks Fact Sheet Link

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