PUBLICATIONS

Title (Click to sort alphabetically) Published Yearsort ascending Topic Resource Type File URL
Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Young Children
Kick the Can's fact sheet on the effects of sugary drinks on young children.
2013 Sugary drinks Fact Sheet Link
Health Advocates Call on Beverage Industry to Make Changes that Matter
Press Release from CCPHA  (January 17, 2013). AsCoca-cola airs a commercial lauding their efforts to address obesity and CCPHA recommends 7 ways the industry could acutally help fight obesity.
2013 Marketing Media/Opinion Link
Expanding Portion Sizes in the US Marketplace: Implications for Nutrition Counseling
Study examining food and beverage portion sizes and changes in these over time. Full Citation: Young LR, Nestle M. Expanding Portion Sizes in the US Marketplace: Implications for Nutrition Counseling. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 2003; 103(2): 231-234.
2013 Obesity Research Link
Water and Sports Drinks
Kick the Can's fact sheet on water and sports drinks.
2013 Sugary drinks Fact Sheet Link
The Health Consequences of Drinking Soda and Other Sugar-Sweetened Beverages
Kick the Can's fact sheet about the health effects of drinking sugary beverages.
2013 Sugary drinks Fact Sheet Link
Healthy hospital food initiatives in the United States: time to ban sugar sweetened beverages to reduce childhood obesity.
In this viewpoint, a pediatrician from the University of California, San Francisco makes a strong case for removing sugar-sweetened beverages from hospitals. Citation: Wojcicki JM. Healthy hospital food initiatives in the United States: time to ban sugar sweetened beverages to reduce childhood obesity. Acta Paediatr. Jun 2013;102(6):560-561.
2013 Sugary drinks Research Link
How Sugar Sweetened Beverages Became a Leading Contributor to the Obesity Epidemic
Kick the Can's fact sheet about the beverage industry's bold and unrelenting marketing campaigns, increases in sugary drink portion sizes, concerted efforts by the beverage industry to keep prices low, and dramatic expansion of sugary drink product availability.
2013 Sugary drinks Fact Sheet Link
Financial Conflicts of Interest and Reporting Bias Regarding the Association between Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Weight Gain: A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews
by Maira Bes-Rastrollo , Matthias B. Schulze, Miguel Ruiz-Canela, Miguel A. Martinez-Gonzalez Summary: Industry sponsors' financial interests might bias the conclusions of scientific research. We examined whether financial industry funding or the disclosure of potential conflicts of interest influenced the results of published systematic reviews (SRs) conducted in the field of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and weight gain or obesity.
2013 Sugary drinks Research Link
Fast Food Facts: Measuring Progress in Nutrition and Marketing to Children and Teens
Fast food companies still target kids with marketing for unhealthy products. In 2012 the fast food industry spent $4.6 billion to advertise mostly unhealthy products, and children and teens remained key audiences for that advertising, according to a new report by the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity. The report highlights a few positive developments, such as healthier sides and beverages in most restaurants' kids' meals, but also shows that restaurants still have a long way to go to promote only healthier fast-food options to kids. 
2013 Marketing Reports and Tool Kits Link
Sugar and Health
Kick the Can's fact sheets on the health effects of consuming sugar and sugary drinks.
2013 Sugar Fact Sheet Link
Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Satiety
Kick the Can's fact sheet on sugary drinks and their effect on satiety (fullness).
2013 Sugar Fact Sheet Link
Sugar Consumption at a Crossroads
As the global cost of obesity approaches $700 billion, international bank Credit Suisse puts an economist's eye to the science of soda, table sugar versus high-fructose corn syrup, the increasing size of humans, and what's to be done.
2013 Sugar Reports and Tool Kits Link
Still Bubbling Over: California Adolescents Drinking More Soda and Other Sugar-Sweetened Beverages
This policy brief examines changes in consumption of soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages among youth in California. Using data from the California Health Interview Survey, this study found that although the percent of children under the age of 12 who drink at least one sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) per day dropped between 2005 and 2012, SSB consumption increased among adolescents.   
2013 Sugary drinks Reports and Tool Kits Link
Relative ability of fat and sugar tastes to activate reward, gustatory, and somatosensory regions
The results from this study imply that sugar more effectively recruits reward and gustatory regions, suggesting that policy, prevention, and treatment interventions should prioritize reductions in sugar intake.
2013 Sugar Research Link
Athlete Endorsements in Food Marketing
This study quantified professional athletes’ endorsement of food and beverages, evaluated the nutritional quality of endorsed products, and determined the number of television commercial exposures of athlete-endorsement commercials for children, adolescents, and adults.
2013 Marketing Research Link
Prospective associations between sugar-sweetened beverage intakes and cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescents 2013 Sugary drinks Research Link
Overweight and Obesity
Kick the Can's fact sheet on overweight and obesity, and the role sugary drinks play.
2013 Obesity Fact Sheet Link
Model Food and Beverage Policy (PHA)
Model language for organizational food and beverage policy
2013 Policy Legislation/Policy Link
Trends in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among youth and adults in the United States: 1999–2010
This study analyzes calorie intake from SSBs for youth and adults who participated in NHANES from 1999 to 2010. Full citation: Kit B, Fakhouri T, Park S, Nielsen S, Ogden C. Trends in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among youth and adults in the United States: 1999-2010. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2013. 
2013 Sugary drinks Research Link
Foods and Beverages Associated with Higher Intake of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages
Analysis of NHANES 2003-2010 surveys reveals sugar-sweetened beverages to be primarily responsible for the high caloric intakes of SSB consumers. In addition, SSB consumption is often associated with the intake of a select number of food and beverage groups, some of which are unhealthy. Full Citation: Mathias KC, Slining MM, Popkin BM. Foods and beverages associated with higher intake of sugar-sweetened beverages. Am J Prev Med. 2013; 44(4): 351-357.
2013 Sugary drinks Research Link
Outdoor advertising, obesity, and soda consumption: a cross-sectional study
The higher the percentage of outdoor advertisements promoting food or non-alcoholic beverages within a census tract, the greater the odds of obesity among its residents. Full Citation: Lesser LI, Zimmerman FJ, Cohen DA. "Outdoor advertising, obesity, and soda consumption: a cross-sectional study" BMC Public Health. 2013; 13:20.
2013 Marketing Research Link
"If It Tastes Good, I’m Drinking It": Qualitative Study of Beverage Consumption Among College Students
"Among students at six colleges, taste and price, not health, were the dominant factors when choosing beverages. To reduce the high sugar-sweetened beverage intake in this population, students felt that interventions using shocking visual images or providing low-cost or free water would be required to overcome preferences." Full Citation: Block JP, Gillman MW, Linakis SJ, Goldman RE.  "'If It Tastes Good, I’m Drinking It': Qualitative Study of Beverage Consumption Among College Students." Journal of ADolescent Health. 2013; Epublisehd.
2013 Sugary drinks Research Link
Impact of menu labeling on consumer behavior: 2008-2012
This review by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation summarizes results from studies that have evaluated the impact of menu labeling on consumer behavior from 2008-2012. The report finds strong public support for menu labeling, though results about the impact of menu labeling on consumer behavior are mixed. 
2013 Obesity Reports and Tool Kits Link
Consumption of artificially and sugar-sweetened beverages and incident type 2 diabetes
This longitudinal cohort study showed a direct association between sugar-sweetened beverages and artificically-sweetened beverages and risk of Type 2 Diabetes in women, which persisted after adjustment for BMI and energy intake. Full Citation: Fagherazzi G, Vilier A, Sartorelli DS, Lajous M, Balkau B, Clavel-Chapelon F. Consumption of artificially and sugar-sweetened beverages and incident type 2 diabetes in the Etude Epide´ miologique aupre` s des femmes de la Mutuelle Ge´ ne´ rale de l’Education Nationale–European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2013.
2013 Sugary drinks, Diabetes Research Link
Factors predicting severe childhood obesity in kindergarteners
Certain parental, prenatal/pregnancy, infant, and early childhood factors (including sugary drink consumption), both alone and in combination, are potent predictors of severe obesity in kindergarteners. Full Citation: Flores, G., Lin, H. Factors predicting severe childhood obesity in kindergarteners. International Journal of Obesity. 2013; 37(1), 31–39.
2012 Sugary drinks Research Link
Assessing the Economics of Obesity and Obesity Interventions
This paper examines the costs of obesity – present and future – and reviews the array of programs currently available to prevent and treat obesity, it also seeks to bridge the gap between those programs and how policymakers measure the benefit of policies to address chronic diseases like obesity. Full Citation: MJ O'Grady, JC Capretta. March 2012. Assessing the Economics of Obesity and Obesity Interventions. The Campaign to End Obesity.
2012 Obesity Reports and Tool Kits Link
Soda and Tobacco Industry Corporate Social Responsibility Campaigns: How Do They Compare?
Article reports that major soda manufacturers have recently employed elaborate, expensive, multinational corporate social responsibility (CSR) campaigns, similar to those created by the tobacco industry.  These CSRs focus responsibility on consumers rather than on the corporation, bolster the companies’ and their products’ popularity, and to prevent regulation. Full Citation: Dorfman L, Cheyne A, Friedman LC, Wadud A, Gottlieb M. Soda and Tobacco Industry Corporate Social Responsibility Campaigns: How Do They Compare? PLoS Med. 2012; 9(6): e1001241.
2012 Beverage industry Media/Opinion Link
The evidence underpinning sports performance products: a systematic assessment.
Systematic review finds that there is a "striking lack of evidence to support the vast majority of sports-related products that make claims related to enhanced performance or recovery." Full Citation: Heneghan C, Howick J, O’Neill B, Gill P, Lasserson D, Cohen D, DAvis R, Ward A, Smith A, Jones G, Thompson M. The evidence underpinning sports performance products: a systematic assessment. BMJ Open. 2012; 2: e1702.
2012 Marketing Research Link
Mythbusting sports and exercise products.
This article examines the evidence behind the 6 primary claims made for sports and exercise products on athletic performance. Full Citation: Heneghan C, Gill P, O'Neil B, Lasserson D, Thake M. Thompson M. Mythbusting sports and exercise products. BMJ. 2012; 345: e4848.
2012 Marketing Research Link
Sucrose-sweetened beverages increase fat storage in the liver, muscle, and visceral fat depot: a 6-mo randomized intervention study.
Randomized trial found that daily intake of sugar-sweetened soft drinks (SSSDs) for 6 mo increases abdominal fat accumulation compared with milk, diet cola, and water. Thus, daily intake of SSSDs is likely to enhance the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Full Citation: Maersk M, Belza A, Stødkilde-Jørgensen H, Ringgaard S, Chabanova E, Thomsen H, Pedersen SB, Astrup A, Richelson B. Sucrose-sweetened beverages increase fat storage in the liver, muscle, and visceral fat depot: a 6-mo randomized intervention study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2012; epub: http://www.ajcn.org/content/early/2011/12/26/ajcn.111.022533.abstract
2012 Sugary drinks Research Link
Dietary Salt Intake, Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption, and Obesity Risk
In Australian children, the amount of salt consumed was positively associated with fluid consumption, and predicted the amount of sugar sweetened beverage consumed. In addition, sugar sweetened beverage consumption was associated with obesity risk, indicating a potential link between salt intake and childhood obesity. Full Citation: Grimes CA, Riddell LJ, Campbell KJ, Nowson CA. Dietary Salt Intake, Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption, and Obesity Risk. Pediatrics. 2012 online at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2012/12/05/peds.2012-1628
2012 Sugary drinks Research Link
Consumption of Added Sugar Among U.S. Children and Adolescents, 2005–2008
Approximately 16% of children and adolescents’ total caloric intakes came from added sugars, exceeding the 2010 Dietary Guidelines recommendations of 5%-15% of total caloric intake. Full Citation: Ervin RB, Kit BK, Carroll MD, et al. Consumption of added sugar among US children and adolescents, 2005-2008.NCHS Data Brief no. 87. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics.
2012 Sugar Research Link
Obesity and severe obesity forecasts through 2030
This study estimates a 33% increase in obesity prevalence and a 130% increase in severe obesity prevalence over the next 2 decades. Full Citation: Finkelstein EA, Khavjou OA, Thompson H, et al. Obesity and severe obesity forecasts through 2030. Am J Prev Med. Jun 2012;42(6):563-570.
2012 Obesity Research Link
Sweetened Beverage Consumption, Incident Coronary Heart Disease and Biomarkers of Risk in Men
Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages was associated with increased risk of Coronary Heart Disease and some adverse changes in lipids, inflammatory factors, and leptin.Full Citation: de Koning L, Malik VS, Kellogg MD, Rimm EB, Willett WC, Hu  FB. Sweetened Beverage Consumption, Incident Coronary Heart Disease and Biomarkers of Risk in Men. Circulation. 2012; 125: 1735-41.
2012 Sugary drinks Research Link
Soft drink intake in relation to incident ischemic heart disease, stroke, and stroke subtypes in Japanese men and women: the Japan Public Health Centre–based study cohort
Soft drink intake is associated with higher risk of ischemic stroke for women. Full Citation: Eshak ES, Iso H, Kokubo Y, Saito I, Yamagishi K, Inoue M, Tsugane S. Soft drink intake in relation to incident ischemic heart disease, stroke, and stroke subtypes in Japanese men and women: the Japan Public Health Centre–based study cohort I. Am J Clin Nutr December 2012 ajcn.037903; First published online October 17, 2012.
2012 Sugary drinks Research Link
Increasing Water Availability During Afterschool Snack: Evidence, Strategies, and Partnerships from a Group Randomized Trial
Participation in the intervention was associated with an average daily decrease of 60.9 kcals from beverages served during snack. Full Citation: Giles CM, Kenney EL, Gortmaker SL, Lee RM, Thayer JC, Mont-Ferguson H, & Cradock AL. Increasing Water Availability During Afterschool Snack: Evidence, Strategies, and Partnerships from a Group Randomized Trial. American journal of preventive medicine. 2012; 43(3): S136–S142.
2012 Sugary drinks Research Link
Prevalence of Obesity and Trends in the Distribution of Body Mass Index Among US Adults, 1999-2010
In 2009-2010, the prevalence of obesity was35.5% among adult menand 35.8% among adult women. No significant change compared with 2003-2008. Full Citation: Flegal KM, Carroll MD, Kit BK, Ogden CL. Prevalence of obesity and trends in the distribution of body mass index among U.S. adults, 1999-2010. Jama. Feb 1 2012;307(5): 491-497.
2012 Obesity Research Link
Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Genetic Risk of Obesity
Study found the genetic association with (fat) adiposity appeared to be more pronounced with greater intake of sugar-sweetened beverages. Full Citation: Qi Q, Chu AY, Kang JH, Jensen MK, Curhan GC, Pasquale LR, Ridker PM, et al. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Genetic Risk of Obesity. New England Journal of Medicine. September 21, 2012. http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1203039.
2012 Sugary drinks Research Link
Nonnutritive Sweeteners: Current Use and Health Perspectives from the American Heart Association
"At this time, there are insufficient data to determine conclusively whether the use of nonnutritive sweeteners to displace caloric sweeteners in beverages and foods reduces added sugars or carbohydrate intakes, or benefits appetite, energy balance, body weight, or cardiometabolic risk factors." Full Citation: Gardner C, Wylie-Rosett J, Gidding SS, Steffen LM, Johnson RK, Reader D, & Lichtenstein AH.  "Nonnutritive Sweeteners: Current Use and Health Perspectives. A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association" Circulation. 2012;126:509-519.
2012 Sugar Research Link
Coffee, Tea, and Sugar-Sweetened Carbonated Soft Drink Intake and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Pooled Analysis of 14 Cohort Studies
There is a suggestive, modest positive association between risk of pancreatic cancer and moderate SSB consumption. Full Citation: Genkinger JM, Li R, Spiegelman D, et al. Coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink intake and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2012; 21(2): 305-318.
2012 Sugary drinks Research Link

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