PUBLICATIONS

Title (Click to sort alphabetically) Published Yearsort ascending Topic Resource Type File URL
Shifts in Patterns and Consumption of Beverages Between 1965 and 2002
Between 1977 and 2002 Americans increased their calorie intake from soft drinks by 228%. Full Citation: Duffey, K. J. and Popkin, B. M. (2007), Shifts in Patterns and Consumption of Beverages Between 1965 and 2002. Obesity, 15: 2739–2747. doi: 10.1038/oby.2007.326
2007 Sugary drinks Research Link
Cardiovascular risk factors and excess adiposity among overweight children and adolescents: the Bogalusa Heart Study
The 4% of children (99th P of BMI-for-age) may be appropriate for identification as very high risk for biochemical abnormalities and severe adult obesity. Full Citation: Freedman DS, Mei Z, Srinivasan SR, Berenson GS, Dietz WH. Cardiovascular risk factors and excess adiposity among overweight children and adolescents: the Bogalusa Heart Study. J Pediatr. Jan 2007;150(1):12-17 e12.
2007 Obesity Research Link
Effects of soft drink consumption on nutrition and health: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
"In a meta-analysis of 88 studies, we examined the association between soft drink consumption and nutrition and health outcomes. We found clear associations of soft drink intake with increased energy intake and body weight. Soft drink intake also was associated with lower intakes of milk, calcium, and other nutrients  and with an increased risk of several medical problems (e.g., diabetes)." Full Citation: Vartanian LR, Schwatrz MB, Borwwnell KD. Effects of soft drink consumption on nutrition and health: A systematic review and meta-analysis. American Journal of Public Health. April 2007; 97(4): 667-675.
2007 Sugary drinks Research Link
Consumption of sugar and sugar-sweetened foods and the risk of pancreatic cancer in a prospective study
Study finds positive association of added sugar, soft drinks, and sweetened fruit soups or stewed fruit consumption with pancreatic cancer risk. Full Citation: Larsson SC, Bergkvist L, Wolk A. Consumption of sugar and sugar-sweetened foods and risk of pancreatic cancer in a prospective study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006; 84: 1171-1176.
2006 Sugar Research Link
Supermarkets, other food stores, and obesity: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study
The presence of supermarkets was associated with a lower prevalence of obesity and overweight, and the presence of convenience stores was associated with a higher prevalence of obesity and overweight. Full Citation: Morland K, Diez Roux AV, Wing S. Supermarkets, other food stores, and obesity: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. Am J Prev Med. Apr 2006;30(4):333-339.
2006 Obesity Research Link
Intake of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Weight Gain: A Systematic Review
A review of 30 studies about sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain concludes that greater consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with weight gain and obesity. Full Citation: Malik VS, Schulze MB, Hu FB. Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: a systematic review. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2006; 84(2):274-88.
2006 Sugar Research Link
Effects of Decreasing Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption on Body Weight in Adolescents: A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Study
Experimental intervention by substituting non-caloric beverages for SSBs reduced SSB consumption by 82% and produced beneficial results in BMI change. Full Citation: Ebbeling CB, Feldman HA, Osganian SK, et al. Effects of decreasing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on body weight in adolescents: A randomized, controlled pilot study. Pediatrics. 2006; 117(3): 673-680.
2006 Sugary drinks Research Link
Carbonated soft drinks and dental caries in the primary dentition
In children aged 2-10, about 13% of children display high carbonated soft drink consumption patterns; they also had a significantly higher dental caries experience in the primary dentition than did children with other fluid consumption patterns. Full Citation: Sohn W, Burt BA, Sowers MR. Carbonated soft drinks and dental caries in the primary dentition. J Dent Res. Mar 2006;85(3):262-266.
2006 Sugary drinks Research Link
Who changes body mass between adolescence and adulthood? Factors predicting change in BMI between 16 year and 30 years in the 1970 British Birth Cohort.
"These data from ‘free-living’ adolescents followed into adult life support the importance of known risk factors such as reduction of sedentary behaviours and reduction of unhealthy eating patterns (consumption of carbonated drinks and takeaway foods, dieting) in the prevention of the persistence of obesity from childhood into adult life." Full Citation: Viner RM, Cole TJ. Who changes body mass between adolescence and adulthood? Factors predicting change in BMI between 16 year and 30 years in the 1970 British Birth Cohort. Int J Obes (Lond). Sep 2006;30(9):1368-1374.
2006 Sugary drinks Research Link
The relation of sugar intake to Beta cell function in overweight Latino children
In overweight Latino children, higher intakes of sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages were associated with lower acute insulin responses and disposition index (both indicators of risk for type 2 diabetes). Full Citation: Davis JN, Ventura EE, Weigensberg MJ, et al. The relation of sugar intake to beta cell function in overweight Latino children. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005; 82: 1004-1010.
2005 Sugar Research Link
Overweight in children and adolescents: pathophysiology, consequences, prevention, and treatment
Overweight in children and adolescents can result in a variety of adverse health outcomes, including type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome. The best approach to this problem is prevention of abnormal weight gain. Full Citation: Daniels SR, Arnett DK, Eckel RH, et al. Overweight in children and adolescents: pathophysiology, consequences, prevention, and treatment. Circulation. Apr 19 2005;111(15):1999-2012.
2005 Obesity Research Link
Adverse effect of high added sugar consumption on dietary intake in American preschoolers
Children with the highest level of added sugar intake (25% of energy or more) had the lowest consumption of most nutrients and servings of grains, vegetables, fruits, and dairy. Full Citation: Kranz S, Smiciklas-Wright H, Siega-Riz AM, Mitchell D. Adverse effect of high added sugar consumption on dietary intake in American preschoolers. J Pediatr. Jan 2005;146(1):105-111.
2005 Sugary drinks Research Link
Liquid Candy
A comprehensive analysis of sugar-sweetened beverages and their effects on health, including historical information and a review of beverage marketing practices. Full citation: Jacobson MF. Liquid Candy: How Soft Drinks Are Harming American’s Health. Center for Science in the Public Interest. Second Edition, First Printing: June 2005. Washington D.C.  
2005 Sugar Research Link
Consumption of high-fructose corn syrup in beverages may play a role in the epidemic of obesity
Analysis of US Department of Agriculture 1967-2000 food consumption tables estimate a daily average consumption of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) to be 132 kcal for all Americans aged 2 y with the top 20% of consumers of caloric sweeteners ingesting 316 kca. Thus, the increase in consumption of HFCS has a temporal relation to the epidemic of obesity, and the overconsumption of HFCS in calorically sweetened beverages possibly playing a role in the epidemic of obesity. Full Citation: Bray GA, Nielsen SJ, Popkin BM. Consumption of high-fructose corn syrup in beverages may play a role in the epidemic of obesity. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004; 79: 537-543.
2004 Sugary drinks Research Link
Dietary fructose reduces circulating insulin and leptin, attenuates postprandial suppression of ghrelin, and increases triglycerides in women
Study demonstrates that decreases of circulating insulin and leptin and increased ghrelin concentrations could lead to increased caloric intake and ultimately contribute to weight gain and obesity during chronic consumption of diets high in fructose. Full Citation: Teff KL, Elliott SS, Tschop M, et al. Dietary fructose reduces circulating insulin and leptin, attenuates postprandial suppression of ghrelin, and increases triglycerides in women. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. Jun 2004;89(6):2963-2972.
2004 Sugar Research Link
Changes in Beverage Intake Between 1977 and 2001
Survey data from 1977-2001 show that , overall, energy intake from sweetened beverages increased 135% and energy intake from milk was reduced by 38%, resulting in a 278 total calorie increase across all age groups. Full Citation: Nielsen SJ, Popkin BM. Changes in beverage intake between 1977 and 2001. Am J Prev Med. 2004; 27: 205-210.
2004 Sugary drinks Research Link
Sugars and Dental Caries
Studies have confirmed the direct relation between intake of dietary sugars and dental caries across the life span. Full Citation: Touger-Decker R, van Loveren C. Sugars and dental caries. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003; 78: 881S-892S. 
2003 Sugar Research Link
The Scientific Basis of Recent US Guidance on Sugars Intake
A comprehensive review of sugar-related research used by the 2000 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Advisory Committee, with clear explanations of the difference between added and natural sugars and the health effects of too much added sugars. A useful primer on the science of sugar. Full Citation: Murphy SP, Johnson RK. The scientific basis of recent US guidance on sugars intake. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2003; 78(suppl):827S-833S.
2003 Sugar Research Link
The Glycemic Index; Physiological Mechanisms Relating to Obesity, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease
This review examines the physiological effects of  the glycemic index and the relevance of these effects in preventing and treating obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Important conclusion: The habitual consumption of high-glycemic index foods, such as sugar-sweetened beverages, may increase risk for obesity, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.  Full Citation: Ludwig DS. The glycemic index: Physiological mechanisms relating to obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. JAMA. 2002; 287: 2414-2423.
2002 Sugar Research Link
Sugared soda consumption and dental caries in the United States
Cumulated long-term consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with more cases of DMFS (Dental, Missing, Filled) in individuals over 25. Full Citation: Heller KE, Burt BA, Eklund SA. Sugared soda consumption and dental caries in the United States. J Dent Res. Oct 2001;80(10):1949-1953.
2001 Sugary drinks Research Link
Relation between Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Drinks and Childhood Obesity: A Prospective, Observational Analysis
An analysis which concludes that increased sugar sweetened beverage intake is associated with obesity in children. Full Citation: Ludwig DS, Peterson KE, Gortmaker SL. Relation between consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks and childhood obesity: a prospective, observational analysis. Lancet. 2001, 357, 505-508.
2001 Sugary drinks Research Link
PHAdvocates Restaurant Survey FINAL Sugary drinks Research Link
Kick the Can - Fast Facts on Sugary Drinks
Kick the Can - Fast Facts on Sugary Drinks.
Sugary drinks Fact Sheet Link
Beverage purchases from stores in Mexico under the excise tax on sugar sweetened beverages: observational study
Colchero et al. BMJ. 2016;352:h6704. What has been the effect on purchases of beverages from stores in Mexico one year after implementation of the excise tax on sugar sweetened beverages?
Policy Research Link

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